Why did Facebook turn off facial recognition and delete 1 billion facial fingerprints?

Facebook announced today that they will no longer use facial recognition systems on their platforms and will delete facial recognition configuration fingerprint files for more than 1 billion people.

Facebook’s face recognition system analyzes the photos of the tagged users and the profile photos of related users to construct a unique identifier or template. Then use this template to identify users in uploaded photos or automatically tag people in “memories”.

Now, a week after the name was changed to Meta, Facebook announced that they would cancel the facial recognition function and delete all profile templates created by the system.

Facebook’s vice president of artificial intelligence, Jerome Pesenti, said in a statement released today: “However, there is a need to weigh the many specific situations in which facial recognition can help with the increasing use of this technology as a whole. Worries.”

“There are many concerns about the status of facial recognition technology in society, and regulators are still formulating a set of clear rules to govern its use.” “In this continuing uncertainty, we believe that the use of facial recognition will be restricted. Appropriate in a narrow set of use cases.”

Facebook said they will shut down the facial recognition system and delete user templates in the next few weeks.

The shutdown includes:

Our technology will no longer automatically recognize whether a human face appears in memories, photos or videos.

People will no longer be able to turn on face recognition for suggestion tags, nor will they be able to see suggestion tags with their names in photos and videos where they may appear. We will still encourage people to manually tag posts to help you and your friends understand who is in the photo or video.

This change will also affect Automatic Alternative Text (AAT), a technology used to create image descriptions for the blind or visually impaired. AAT currently recognizes people in approximately 4% of photos. After the change, AAT will still be able to recognize how many people are in the photo, but will no longer try to recognize that everyone is using facial recognition. Otherwise, AAT will continue to operate normally, and we will work closely with blind and visually impaired people on technology to continuously improve AAT. You can learn more about what these changes mean for users of AAT on the Facebook accessibility page.

If you choose our face recognition settings, we will delete the template used to identify you. If you turn off the face recognition settings, there are no templates to delete and no changes will occur.

Last week, Facebook changed its name to Meta. Meta will adopt a new nickname based on the science fiction term Metaverse to describe its vision of working and playing in the virtual world of VR. The company also said this week that it will spend approximately $10 billion next year to develop the technology needed to build Meta Universe. Zuckerberg said that there is still a long way to go, and the elements of the meta-universe may become mainstream within 5 to 10 years. Zuckerberg added that the company expects to “invest billions of dollars in the next few years before Metaverse reaches scale.”

The rebranding was also carried out after the company processed a series of news reports from whistleblower Frances Haugen with internal documents in the past month.

Critics believe that Facebook’s rebranding not only marks a business shift, but also has the opportunity to save its reputation to avoid further media and regulatory scrutiny.

Facebook has just reached a $650 million settlement in a lawsuit in Illinois, which claims that Facebook collected and stored biometric data of Facebook users without consent. If Facebook does not act, more states or other countries may face similar lawsuits in the future. At that time, even fines or litigation fees may consume the investment money (10 billion US dollars) of Yuan Universe.

From this point of view, Facebook’s operations that run counter to the current major technology companies may not simply reject this technology. On the one hand, it is to avoid the occurrence of similar lawsuits and cause high fines or settlement fees in name; on the other hand, from the future META. From the perspective of VR augmented virtual reality, the future collection will no longer be just a face, but a person’s whole body.

We have reason to believe that Facebook wants to understand that giving up “face” fingerprints will earn a rant and save a lot of fines. Of course, “full-body” fingerprints will definitely not get rid of in the future.

Further reading: Meta trademark has been applied for registration by PC manufacturers

Facebook announced last week that it would change its company name to Meta. Despite announcing a rebranding, the company does not seem to be ready for a smooth transition.

The founder of custom PC manufacturer Meta applied for a trademark of the Meta name on August 23, covering computer-related goods and services, including peripherals, servers, network equipment, laptops, tablets, and components. This is far before any rumors about Facebook turning to Meta.

Joe Darger and Zack Shutt, the co-founders of Meta PC, said that the company has been in operation for a year, but waited until August of this year to apply for a trademark. Meta PC’s trademark application has not yet been formally approved, but it has expressed its willingness to cede the name to Facebook at a cost of 20 million U.S. dollars (approximately 128 million yuan).

Because a source familiar with the matter said that Facebook believes it has the necessary rights to use the “Meta” trademark for itself. But if Meta PC can indeed obtain the trademark in the future, the cost of Facebook obtaining the trademark may become higher. Currently, Meta PC is enjoying some benefits from Facebook’s rebranding announcement. Its social media fans have increased by 5000%, which may lead to more PC sales.

Xiaozha pays directly or faces a lawsuit, we will wait and see.

Facebook announced today that they will no longer use facial recognition systems on their platforms and will delete facial recognition configuration fingerprint files for more than 1 billion people.

Facebook’s face recognition system analyzes the photos of the tagged users and the profile photos of related users to construct a unique identifier or template. Then use this template to identify users in uploaded photos or automatically tag people in “memories”.

Now, a week after the name was changed to Meta, Facebook announced that they would cancel the facial recognition function and delete all profile templates created by the system.

Facebook’s vice president of artificial intelligence, Jerome Pesenti, said in a statement released today: “However, there is a need to weigh the many specific situations in which facial recognition can help with the increasing use of this technology as a whole. Worries.”

“There are many concerns about the status of facial recognition technology in society, and regulators are still formulating a set of clear rules to govern its use.” “In this continuing uncertainty, we believe that the use of facial recognition will be restricted. Appropriate in a narrow set of use cases.”

Facebook said they will shut down the facial recognition system and delete user templates in the next few weeks.

The shutdown includes:

Our technology will no longer automatically recognize whether a human face appears in memories, photos or videos.

People will no longer be able to turn on face recognition for suggestion tags, nor will they be able to see suggestion tags with their names in photos and videos where they may appear. We will still encourage people to manually tag posts to help you and your friends understand who is in the photo or video.

This change will also affect Automatic Alternative Text (AAT), a technology used to create image descriptions for the blind or visually impaired. AAT currently recognizes people in approximately 4% of photos. After the change, AAT will still be able to recognize how many people are in the photo, but will no longer try to recognize that everyone is using facial recognition. Otherwise, AAT will continue to operate normally, and we will work closely with blind and visually impaired people on technology to continuously improve AAT. You can learn more about what these changes mean for users of AAT on the Facebook accessibility page.

If you choose our face recognition settings, we will delete the template used to identify you. If you turn off the face recognition settings, there are no templates to delete and no changes will occur.

Last week, Facebook changed its name to Meta. Meta will adopt a new nickname based on the science fiction term Metaverse to describe its vision of working and playing in the virtual world of VR. The company also said this week that it will spend approximately $10 billion next year to develop the technology needed to build Meta Universe. Zuckerberg said that there is still a long way to go, and the elements of the meta-universe may become mainstream within 5 to 10 years. Zuckerberg added that the company expects to “invest billions of dollars in the next few years before Metaverse reaches scale.”

The rebranding was also carried out after the company processed a series of news reports from whistleblower Frances Haugen with internal documents in the past month.

Critics believe that Facebook’s rebranding not only marks a business shift, but also has the opportunity to save its reputation to avoid further media and regulatory scrutiny.

Facebook has just reached a $650 million settlement in a lawsuit in Illinois, which claims that Facebook collected and stored biometric data of Facebook users without consent. If Facebook does not act, more states or other countries may face similar lawsuits in the future. At that time, even fines or litigation fees may consume the investment money (10 billion US dollars) of Yuan Universe.

From this point of view, Facebook’s operations that run counter to the current major technology companies may not simply reject this technology. On the one hand, it is to avoid the occurrence of similar lawsuits and cause high fines or settlement fees in name; on the other hand, from the future META. From the perspective of VR augmented virtual reality, the future collection will no longer be just a face, but a person’s whole body.

We have reason to believe that Facebook wants to understand that giving up “face” fingerprints will earn a rant and save a lot of fines. Of course, “full-body” fingerprints will definitely not get rid of in the future.

Further reading: Meta trademark has been applied for registration by PC manufacturers

Facebook announced last week that it would change its company name to Meta. Despite announcing a rebranding, the company does not seem to be ready for a smooth transition.

The founder of custom PC manufacturer Meta applied for a trademark of the Meta name on August 23, covering computer-related goods and services, including peripherals, servers, network equipment, laptops, tablets, and components. This is far before any rumors about Facebook turning to Meta.

Joe Darger and Zack Shutt, the co-founders of Meta PC, said that the company has been in operation for a year, but waited until August of this year to apply for a trademark. Meta PC’s trademark application has not yet been formally approved, but it has expressed its willingness to cede the name to Facebook at a cost of 20 million U.S. dollars (approximately 128 million yuan).

Because a source familiar with the matter said that Facebook believes it has the necessary rights to use the “Meta” trademark for itself. But if Meta PC can indeed obtain the trademark in the future, the cost of Facebook obtaining the trademark may become higher. Currently, Meta PC is enjoying some benefits from Facebook’s rebranding announcement. Its social media fans have increased by 5000%, which may lead to more PC sales.

Xiaozha pays directly or faces a lawsuit, we will wait and see.

The Links:   LQ065T5AR05 SKD145-16

Author: Yoyokuo